Winners of 2020 "Show Us Your BRAINs!" Contest

Congratulations to the winners of this year's “Show Us Your BRAINs Contest!”

THANK YOU TO ALL THOSE WHO SUBMITTED EXTRAORDINARY PHOTOS & VIDEOS!!!

 

 

Intact whole-brain imaging of neurons  - First Place winner

FIRST PLACE VIDEO WINNER

Intact Whole-brain Imaging of Neurons

Thy1-GFP mouse brain optically cleared and imaged with the Zeiss Light-sheet Z.1 microscope using a Mesoscale Imaging System.

By Sunil Gandhi, Ricardo Azevedo and Damian Wheeler, University of California, Irvine and Translucence Biosystems

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reconstructing the mind of a worm  - Second Place winner

SECOND PLACE VIDEO WINNER

Reconstructing the Mind of a Worm

The C. elegans brain, including every nerve and muscle fiber, being reconstructed by serial-section electron microscopy.

By Daniel Witvliet, University of Toronto and Harvard University

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fly through a fly brain - third Place winner

THIRD PLACE VIDEO WINNER
Fly Through a Fly Brain

These cells were reconstructed by artificial intelligence from Princeton University's Murthy Seung Lab using electron microscope images HHMI Janelia.

By Amy Sterling, Princeton University and EyeWire

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cortical Forest - First Place winner

FIRST PLACE PHOTO WINNER

Cortical Forest

Mouse Layer V cortical neurons eYFP-labeled (Thy1-H) and imaged after CLARITY processing of a whole brain. Maximum projection with depth color coding.

By Linus Manubens-Gil and Jim Swoger, Centre de Regulació Genòmica (CRG) and EMBL Mesoscopic Imaging Facility

 

 

 

 

Radiating Neurons - Second Place winner

SECOND PLACE PHOTO WINNER

Radiating Neurons

4-week-old rat cortical neurons labeled for dendrites (red), axons (green), and nuclei (blue).

By Karthik Krishnamurthy, Davide Trotti, and Piera Pasinelli, Thomas Jefferson University

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The waterdrop hippocampus - third Place winner

THIRD PLACE PHOTO WINNER

The Ephemeral Hippocampus

The brain is everywhere to us neuroscientists. This exquisite 'hippocampus', with delicate dendrites, is actually a waterdrop captured at highspeed.

By Tallie Z. Baram, Jeremy Barry, and Joan Morris, University of California, Irvine, © 2017 Joan Morris (www.joanmorrisartist.com)