Funded Awards

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Title Investigator Institute Fiscal Year FOA Number Status Project Number Priority Area Summary
Connectome 2.0: Developing the next generation human MRI scanner for bridging studies of the micro-, meso- and macro-connectome Basser, Peter J. Huang, Susie Yi Rosen, Bruce R (contact) Wald, Lawrence L Witzel, Thomas Massachusetts General Hospital 2018 Active
  • Human Neuroscience
  • Integrated Approaches
  • Interventional Tools
  • Monitor Neural Activity

Understanding the structural basis of brain function requires spanning multiple spatial scales, from synaptic circuits to whole-brain systems, but current technology is limited in its ability to successfully integrate across these scales. Dr. Bruce Rosen and a team of investigators propose the development of a human magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner that images brain structural connectivity in-vivo. Building upon previous work from the Human Connectome Project (HCP), these tools will advance brain imaging with the capability of estimating cellular and axon level microstructural brain circuits at very high resolution. The project will have the potential to significantly expand our knowledge on hierarchical anatomy and functionality of both healthy and diseased human brains, with impact on both neuroscience research and clinical applications.

In Vivo Brain Network Latency Mapping BASSER, PETER J National Institute of Child Health and Human Development 2018
Active
  • Human Neuroscience
  • Interventional Tools
  • Monitor Neural Activity

The purpose of this project is to develop, explore, and begin implementing a new non-invasive, painless Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) methodology to measure the time (latency) it takes neural impulses to travel from one functional area in the cerebral cortex to another. This project will use microstructure imaging and neurophysiological data to estimate conduction delays along white matter pathways, incorporating whole-brain diffusion MRI measurements of various white matter tract characteristics. Integrating data derived from resting state and other neurophysiological mapping approaches, these methods will yield high spatial and temporal resolution latency matrix data. Dr. Basser's website is available at https://irp.nih.gov/pi/peter-basser